Recent Events

 
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Green Side Up, Brown Side Down!
Saturday, September 10, 2016
Held at Braeside, the Historic Home of Edith Patch
500 College Avenue, Old Town, Maine
It was the perfect day to plant another tree at Braeside!  Licensed arborist and University of Maine Instructor tish carr and her students helped us choose a good site, understand soil test results, and get a beautiful flowering crab apple tree off and growing!  This tree, planted in the bird observation area at Braeside, will grow to be about 20 feet tall and will provide spring flowers for our bees and butterflies, as well as fruit for many bird species through fall and winter.  In fact, a flock of Cedar Waxwings was watching from the edge of the nearby woods, no doubt looking forward to the yummy treats they’ll enjoy once the tree is established.  This session was part of the  University of Maine’s arboriculture lab and field course.  The class made two other skill-building visits to Braeside in September and early October, assisted by licensed Maine arborists Bill Burman and Didier Bonner-Ganter.

 

Insect Adventures!
Saturday, May 7, 2016
Held at The Orono Public Library, 39 Pine Street, Orono
At this annual celebration of the insect world, explorers young and old investigated the abundance and diversity of our tiny six-footed neighbors. Professional and amateur entomologists from the Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch, the University of Maine School of Biology and Ecology, and the Maine Entomological Society were on hand to help examine and identify insects, as well as share stories, crafts, games, and snacks. This event is a joyful collaboration of the Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch, the Orono Public Library, the University of Maine School of Biology and Ecology, and the Maine Entomological Society.

A Sugar Maple goes into the ground at Braeside.

A Sugar Maple goes into the ground at Braeside.

Green Side Up, Brown Side Down!
Saturday, April 30, 2016
Held at Braeside, the Historic Home of Edith Patch
500 College Avenue, Old Town, Maine
Licensed arborist and University of Maine Instructor tish carr and her students planted a new Sugar Maple tree at Braeside as part of their arboriculture lab and field course.  We learned how to choose an appropriate site, interpret soil test results, select a healthy tree, plant it, and provide proper follow-up care.  This tree, planted at the far edge of the bird observation area at Braeside, will grow to be 50-70 feet tall over a long lifespan and will provide food for many bird species throughout the seasons.  You can read more about our April tree planting, the ecological role of this sugar maple tree in Braeside’s habitat, and see photos of other springtime adventures by clicking these links: Braeside Update and Nature Notes from Braeside.

The University of Maine's 2016 Edith Patch Award winners are (left to right) Corianne Tatariw, Tizezew Sisay, Jesica Waller, Savannah Haines, and Lisa Weatherly. Photo courtesy Bradley Beauregard.

The University of Maine’s 2016 Edith Patch Award winners are (left to right) Corianne Tatariw, Tizezew Sisay, Jesica Waller, Savannah Haines, and Lisa Weatherly. Photo courtesy Bradley Beauregard.

Eleventh Annual Celebration Honoring the Life and Legacy of Dr. Edith Marion Patch
Sunday, April 17, 2016, The Thomas Lynch University Club,
Fogler Library, The University of Maine
In a special ceremony and reception, the 2016 Edith Patch Awards were presented to five outstanding undergraduate and graduate women who are carrying on Dr. Patch’s legacy of commitment to science, agriculture, engineering, and environmental education at the University of Maine.  Five additional undergraduate and graduate women were named Distinguished Nominees at the event.   Through oral presentations and poster displays, the honorees shared their work with reception guests.

The Edith Patch Award is given annually in recognition of scholarship and service and the potential for future contribution.   To learn more about this year’s honorees and to find updates on some past Edith Patch Award winners, click here.

From Mouse to Moose: Maine’s Animal Health Lab
Saturday, March 26, 2016,  at The Inn at Dirigo Pines,
9 Alumni Drive, Orono
The University of Maine Animal Health Laboratory (UMAHL) has a history of service to Maine’s diverse animal industries, spanning the animal kingdom. From salamanders to salmonella, sturgeon to stallions, chinchillas to chickens, diagnostic information is made accessible to veterinarians and producers in a local, timely fashion.  Anne Lichtenwalner DVM PhD, Associate Professor and Director of the UMAHL, presented recent work that has included studies of parasites in ruminant species, both domestic and wild.  She also provided a progress report on the new lab facility that was approved by voters of Maine through a 2014 bond issue.

Students from Stillwater Montessori School and The University of Maine School of Forestry at Braeside

Students from Stillwater Montessori School and The University of Maine School of Forestry after an afternoon at Braeside


Winter Ecology at Braeside:
A 4-H Science Saturday presented in collaboration with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and The University of Maine School of Forest Resources.

Saturday, December 5, 2015
held at Braeside, the Historic Home of Edith Patch
500 College Avenue, Old Town
Middle school and high school students participated in hands-on explorations of the garden and grounds, woodland, and meadow surrounding Edith Patch’s historic home. Students enrolled in UMaine’s SFR452 Environmental Interpretation and Certified Interpretive Guide program led activities, under the direction of Associate Professor Jessica Leahy and UMaine Cooperative Extension Instructor Laura Wilson.

Exploring the Environment at Braeside
Friday, November 13, 2015 1:00pm,
held at Braeside, The Historic Home of Dr. Edith Marion Patch
500 College Avenue, Old Town
Elementary students from Stillwater Montessori School participated in hands-on explorations of the garden and grounds, woodland, and meadow surrounding Edith Patch’s historic home. Students enrolled in UMaine’s Environmental Interpretation and Certified Interpretive Guide program led activities from Project Wild, under the direction of Associate Professor Jessica Leahy.

 

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Annual Meeting and Randy Alford Memorial Lecture
Saturday, November 7, 2015, 1:00p.m, Page Farm and Home Museum, University of Maine
After a brief business meeting, the Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch celebrated publication of “Without Benefit of Insects: The Story of Edith M. Patch of the University of Maine.” Author and founding member K. Elizabeth Gibbs, professor emerita of entomology at the University of Maine, has conducted a detailed investigation of Dr. Patch’s life and career, and offered an intriguing portrait of this eminent scientist. Cassie’s detective work, conducted over many years, has turned up fascinating material relating not only to Edith Patch’s importance as an entomologist, but also her relationships with colleagues, students, relatives, and friends in the community.
The book is available in paperback from The Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch, 52 Penobscot Street, Orono ME 04473. The price is $10 per copy, plus $3.50 shipping on orders under $50 going to a single address. Shipping is free on orders over $50 to one address. A digital version is also available for free download at the University of Maine’s Digital Commons Site:
http://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/aes_miscpubs/23/

A bee box on the meadow's edge at Braeside. Photo courtesy Joanne D. Alex, Stillwater Montessori School.

A bee box on the meadow’s edge at Braeside. Photo courtesy Joanne D. Alex, Stillwater Montessori School.

While we wait to determine whether bat boxes can be installed at Braeside for the bats’ return to activity in spring, we still enjoy monitoring the bee boxes that were set in place in the garden and meadow’s edge!  Students at the Stillwater Montessori School and its affilitated Afterschool Environmental Club, built, decorated, and installed the bee boxes last year.  This native pollinator habitat enhancement project was a collaborative of Stillwater Montessori School, the Biodiversity Research Institute, and the Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch, and was funded by the Maine Community Foundation.

In this close-up of a Braeside bee box, you can see that different-sized holes have been drilled to accommodate different species of native bees. Photo courtesy of Joanne D. Alex, Stillwater Montessori School.

In this close-up of a Braeside bee box, you can see that different-sized holes have been drilled to accommodate different species of native bees. Photo courtesy of Joanne D. Alex, Stillwater Montessori School.

Many of our native bees are solitary.  Some species nest in the ground, others nest in small holes in dead trees — or in bee boxes!  The female of a cavity-nesting species lays one or more eggs in each hole and provides a food supply for the soon-to-be-hatched larvae.  The mother then seals the egg chamber and moves on to a new egg-laying site.  At adulthood, the new generation bee will break the seal of the chamber and fly out of its hole to forage amongst pollen and nectar sources in the surrounding habitat.

Native pollinators are essential to many of Maine’s economically important crops, including blueberries and apples.

Batbox construction with University of Maine’s Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society
Saturday, October 31, 2015, 10:00am, Nutting Hall, University of Maine

UMaine students assemble one of the batboxes.

UMaine students assemble one of the batboxes.

Did you hear the power tools, hammering, and lively conversation on Halloween morning? That was a gathering of members of The Wildlife Society student chapter, along with students enrolled in WLE100 Introduction to Wildlife Resources, and representatives of the Friends of Edith Patch, all celebrating the end of Bat Week with a batbox-athon! Thanks to a grant from the Friends of Patch, TWS purchased 5 batbox kits and assembled them, with the intent to install them in ecologically appropriate locations around campus and community. Our hope is that the boxes will provide safe roosting places and help contribute to a rebuilding of our local bat population.

Monitoring Bat Populations in Maine: New Strategies for Citizen-Science Data Collection
Sunday, October 25, 2015, 1:00pm, Media Room, The Inn at Dirigo Pines, 900 Alumni Drive, Orono
Participants enjoyed an introduction to the behavior and ecology of Maine’s bats, and learned about an innovative project that locates and identifies bats in our region as part of an effort to increase understanding of the status of these rapidly declining mammals. University of Maine wildlife biologist Erik Blomberg demonstrated new technology and shared preliminary findings. This program was collaboratively sponsored with the Orono Bog Boardwalk.

Exploring the Environment at Braeside
Friday, October 23, 1:00pm, at Braeside, the Historic Home of Edith Patch, 500 College Avenue, Old Town

Edith Patch would have been surprised and delighted to look out her window and see children and grown-ups pretending to be trees!

Edith Patch would have been surprised and delighted to look out her window and see children and grown-ups pretending to be trees!

What woodland mystery is hidden in this box?

What woodland mystery is hidden in this box?

It was a blustery autumn day when children from Stillwater Montessori School visited Braeside for lively explorations of the habitats surrounding Edith Patch’s historic home.  The activities were drawn from the Project Learning Tree curriculum, and led by University of Maine students enrolled in SFR452 Environmental Interpretation, under the direction of Associate Professor Jessica Leahy.

Exploring the Environment at Braeside
Friday, October 2, 1:00pm, at Braeside, the Historic Home of Edith Patch, 500 College Avenue, Old Town

A student invites listeners to consider the cultural and conservation aspects of hunting.

A student invites listeners to consider cultural and conservation aspects of hunting.

Participants learn about unintended consequences of pesticide use.

Participants learn about unintended consequences of pesticide use.

On a brisk autumn day, members attended presentations in the garden, grounds, woodland, and meadow surrounding Edith Patch’s historic home, to learn how Dr. Patch’s scientific endeavors and environmental philosophy retain their value for our own time. Students enrolled in UMaine’s Environmental Interpretation and Certified Interpretive Guide program discussed insects, alewives, crows, black bears, conservation ethics, and much more, under the direction of Associate Professor Jessica Leahy.

Braeside Tree Survey
Saturday, September 19, 1:00-3:00pm, at Braeside, the Historic Home of Edith Patch, 500 College Avenue, Old Town

Arborist tish carr (left) sizes up one of Braeside's trees.

Arborist tish carr (left) sizes up one of Braeside’s trees.

What trees did Edith Patch walk among, when she strolled the grounds at Braeside?  Licensed arborist and UMaine Forestry Instructor tish carr surveyed the trees around Edith Patch’s homestead, assessed their condition, pointed out invasive species, and discussed strategies for maintaining a healthy and varied tree-scape in keeping with Edith Patch’s environmental philosophy.

Further Adventures in Outdoor Learning Labs at Braeside!

A UMaine student prepares ground for bench installation.

A UMaine student prepares ground for bench installation.

UMaine students install a bench on the Meadow Trail

UMaine students install a bench on the Meadow Trail

On Friday, September 18, 2015, University of Maine students in SFR452 Environmental Interpretation under the direction of Associate Professor Jessica Leahy, installed benches and signposts for the outdoor learning labs at Braeside. Although Edith Patch’s home itself is still undergoing rehabilitation, visitors strolling along meadow or woodland trails can now find places to sit down, make observations of plant and animal life, study the streamside habitat, or simply contemplate the views of nature that Dr. Patch herself enjoyed. As the Edith Patch Environmental Observatory at Braeside approaches its official opening, we will make trail guides and other informational materials available online and at the site. Stay tuned!

Bug Maine-ia
Tuesday, September 15, 2015, Maine State Museum, Augusta

edie@bugmaineia

Each September for the past 13 years, children from all over the state have swarmed to the hive of insect activity and information offered by the Maine State Museum’s Bug Maine-ia! The Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch, a part of this event from its very start, were unable to staff a table this year due to a schedule conflict. However, we are delighted that our longstanding member, Edie King, was able to participate. This year, Edie partnered with Charlene Donahue, Forest Entomologist with the Maine Forest Service. More than 1,700 children had the opportunity to explore the insect world, thanks to Edie and all the other Bug Maine-ia staff and volunteers!

Hot off the Presses!
Without Benefit of Insects: The Story of Edith M. Patch of the University of Maine
by K. Elizabeth Gibbs, Professor Emerita of Entomology
Orono, Maine: Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station
Miscellaneous Publication 763, 2014
Since arriving at the University of Maine in 1972, Cassie Gibbs has been intrigued by the life and work of Edith Marion Patch. Cassie has enjoyed many years of digging through document files as well as collecting books, unpublished manuscripts, and items formerly owned by her pioneering predecessor.   The result of her detective work has now been published!  You can link to a downloadable digital version of the book here or order a print copy from The Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch, 52 Penobscot Street, Orono ME 04473. The cost of the print version is $10.00 plus $3.50 shipping.
You can meet the author, hear about her detective work, and celebrate the publication of this biography at our annual meeting on November 7. Complete details of the event can be found here.

Insect Adventures!
Saturday, May 16, 2015, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon, Orono Public Library
Children of all ages brought their friends and families to this annual event. They enjoyed a bug hunt, got up close and personal with aquatic insects, played camouflage games, learned about Maine’s lost ladybugs, and lots more. Each year, this popular event is hosted by the Orono Public Library and staffed by volunteers from the Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch, the University of Maine’s entomology faculty, staff, and students, and members of the Maine Entomological Society.

 

Tenth Annual Celebration of the Life and Legacy of Dr. Edith Marion Patch
Sunday, April 19, 2015, 3:00 p.m., Thomas Lynch University Club,
Fogler Library, University of Maine

EdithPatchHonorees2015

This special, invitation-only program featured presentations and poster sessions by the University of Maine’s next generation of women in science. The Edith Patch Awards were presented in recognition of outstanding undergraduate and graduate women who are carrying on Dr. Patch’s legacy of commitment to science, agriculture, engineering, and environmental education. We also announced and celebrated publication of Without Benefit of Insects: The Story of Edith M. Patch of the University of Maine, by K. Elizabeth Gibbs, professor emerita of entomology at the University of Maine. The event was sponsored by the Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch and hosted by Fogler Library Friends.
Shown standing, left to right are:
Robert Lad, Professor of Physics; Sandra Goff, Edith Patch Awardee – Doctoral Level (Ecology and Environmental Sciences/Economics); Francois Amar, Dean of the Honors College and Professor of Chemistry; Caroline Noblet, Assistant Professor, School of Economics; Julia Sell, Edith Patch Awardee – Undergraduate Level (Physics); Rachel Chase, Edith Patch Distinguished Nominee – Undergraduate Level (Animal and Veterinary Sciences); Jennifer Lund, Edith Patch Awardee – Master’s Level (Biology/Entomology); Andrei Alyokhin, Director, School of Biology and Ecology, and Professor of Entomology; Hillary Morin, Edith Patch Distinguished Nominee – Undergraduate Level (Biology/Entomology).
Shown seated, left to right, are:
Hina Hashmi, Edith Patch Distinguished Nominee – Undergraduate Level (Molecular and Biomedical Sciences); Abigail Feuka, Edith Patch Awardee – Undergraduate Level (Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Ecology); Janet Gorman, Edith Patch Distinguished Nominee – Master’s Level (School of Forest Resources).
Nominating faculty unable to participate in the photo are: Anne Lichtenwalner, Associate Professor of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Jessica Leahy, Associate Professor of Human Dimensions of Natural Resources, and Eleanor Groden, Professor of Entomology and Associate Director of the School of Biology and Ecology.
(Photo by Gretchen Gfeller, Public Relations Manager, Fogler Library.)
*****
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Rescue and Rehabilitation of Wild Birds in Maine
Saturday, March 28, 2015
1:00 p.m., Nutting Hall 100, University of Maine
Diane Winn, Executive Director, Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center

Avian Haven, located in Freedom, Maine, has the largest case load of any practice in northern New England, treating more than 1700 birds from more than 100 species annually under its federal and state permits. Last year alone, Avian Haven admitted 257 raptors, including 39 Bald Eagles, 72 Barred Owls, and 42 Broad-winged Hawks, along with hundreds of other birds in distress, often as a result of encounters with human activity. In this presentation, Avian Haven’s Executive Director Diane Winn described the process of caring for injured and orphaned birds, discussed the challenges faced by Maine’s wild birds, and suggested ways that ordinary citizens can both protect birds in their natural habitat and support Avian Haven’s effort to rehabilitate birds and return them to the wild.
(Photo by Diane Winn, Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center)
*****
The Randy Alford Memorial Presentation:
The Emerald Ash Borer in Maine:
An Assessment of Efforts to Increase Awareness and Action

Saturday, November 1, 2014
1:00 p.m., Page Farm and Home Museum
Jessica Leahy, Associate Professor, Human Dimensions of Natural Resources, University of Maine; and
Ann Gibbs, Acting Director, Division of Animal and Plant Health, Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry

The Emerald Ash Borer is an invasive insect that is destroying valuable forest stands in the United States. Although it has not yet been reported in Maine, our state’s foresters, forest researchers, property owners, government officials, and educators are working together to increase awareness of this pest. They are promoting both knowledge and vigilance so that, should the insect threaten our culturally and economically important ash trees, the problem can be contained and its impact minimized. The presenters shared information about the EAB and invited attendees to participate in a sample survey. The annual business meeting of the Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch was also conducted.
*****

Works in Progress
Saturday, October 4, 2014
1:00 p.m., Page Farm and Home Museum, University of Maine

The program featured updates on the forthcoming biography of Dr. Edith Marion Patch, written by Professor Emerita K. Elizabeth Gibbs; progress on the rehabilitation of Braeside and establishment of the Edith Patch Environmental Observatory; and reports on science and education outreach and collaboratives on campus, in the local community, and farther afield.
*****

Insect Adventures!
Saturday, May 17, 2014
10:00 a.m. Orono Public Library

Children of all ages brought friends and families to this annual event, where they went on a bug hunt, got up close and personal with aquatic insects, played camouflage games, learned about Maine’s lost ladybugs, and lots more. The event was hosted by the Orono Public Library and staffed by volunteers from the Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch and the University of Maine’s entomology faculty, staff, and students.
*****

 

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Ninth Annual Celebration of the Life and Legacy of Dr. Edith Marion Patch
Sunday, April 27, 2014
3:00 – 5:00 p.m. Thomas Lynch University Club,
Fogler Library, University of Maine

This annual event featured presentations by the University of Maine’s next generation of women in science. Edith Patch Awards were given in recognition of outstanding undergraduate and graduate women who are carrying on Dr. Patch’s legacy of commitment to science, agriculture, engineering, and environmental education. Shown, left to right in the front row are 2014 Master’s-level Honoree Shannon Chapman, 2014 Master’s-level Honoree Erin Roche, 2014 Distinguished undergraduate nominee Sabrina Vivian, and 2014 Undergraduate Honoree Evelyn Fairman.  Behind them, left to right, are nominators Dean Francois Amar and Professors David Nievandt and Frank Drummond, and Associate Professors Cynthia Loftin, and Ellen Mallory.  Also participating were past honorees Adrienne Leppold and Minna Mathiasson.  The event was sponsored by the Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch and hosted by Fogler Library Friends.
*****

Climate Reality
Saturday, March 29, 2014
1:00 p.m., The Inn at Dirigo Pines (Media Room)
with Sharon Tisher, J.D., Lecturer, University of Maine School of Economics and Honors College

What have we learned, and what more can we do, individually and collectively, about climate change? This program explored evolving problems and positive actions.
*****

An Outdoor Learning Lab at Braeside
Saturday, November 2, 2013 (preliminary designs)
1:00 p.m., Page Farm and Home Museum, University of Maine
Friday, December 13, 2013 (completed projects)
1:00 p.m., Nutting Hall, School of Forest Resources, University of Maine
with students of UMaine’s School of Forest Resources under the direction of Jessica Leahy, Associate Professor, Human Dimensions of Natural Resources

Advanced undergraduate students in SFR452 Environmental Interpretation have expanded and elaborated an existing landscape plan in order to create outdoor learning spaces in the woodland, wetland, meadow, and lawns surrounding Braeside, Dr. Edith Marion Patch’s historic home. In their November presentation, students shared their proposed project plans, which would incorporate environmental and historical research as a foundation for trail design, signage, podcasts, and other educational elements to support active learning at Braeside’s living laboratory. Students’ finished designs and educational materials were presented in December.
*****

Dragonflies as Indicators of Mercury Contamination in Maine and Beyond
Saturday, October 26, 2013
10:00 a.m. to noon, Old Town Public Library
with Sarah Nelson, Assistant Research Professor, Sen. George J. Mitchell Center, University of Maine and
Ed Lindsay, Science Teacher, Old Town High School

Scientist Sarah Nelson has enlisted the aid of Ed Lindsay along with other Maine teachers and their students to study mercury levels in dragonfly larvae, as a means of predicting which areas are most likely to be affected by mercury pollution. In this presentation, Sarah, Ed, and a student discussed what this sentinel species can tell us about our environment, and how students and teachers are contributing to the growth of scientific and environmental understanding.
*****

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The 2013 Edith Patch Award honorees, with their nominators

Eighth Annual Earth Day Celebration of the
Life and Legacy of Dr. Edith Marion Patch
Sunday, April 21, 2013
3:00 – 5:00 p.m., The Thomas Lynch University Club
Fogler Library, University of Maine

Each year at the Earth Day Reception, the Edith Patch Awards are presented to outstanding undergraduate and graduate women who are carrying on Dr. Patch’s legacy of commitment to science. Shown, left to right, are Professor Frank Drummond, nominator; 2013 Doctoral honoree Sara Bushmann, 2013 Undergraduate honoree Minna Mathiasson, 2013 Master’s level honoree Abigail Sullivan, and Assistant Professor Tim Waring, nominator. To read about the accomplishments of these awardees, please see the Fall, 2013 Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch Newsletter.
Also recognized at the event was Associate Research Professor Joyce Longcore, recently named Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. A reception followed the award ceremony and student presentations.
*****

 

MBTUcovermed

Beyond the Usual: Exploring Maine with Edith Patch and the Pickerings
Saturday, September 28, 2013
1:00 – 3:00 p.m., Page Farm and Home Museum, University of Maine
with Marisue Pickering and John Pickering, authors and educators

Marisue Pickering and John Pickering, authors and educators, have recently published Maine: Beyond the Usual, a guide to some of our state’s loveliest and most interesting hidden treasures. In their presentation, the Pickerings revealed some fascinating scientific and literary connections between Edith Patch and several sites explored in the book. They also shared a sampling of what might be included in their next volume.
*****

 

Edie King's display shows photography's usefulness as a tool for insect study

Edie King’s display demonstrates photography’s usefulness as a tool for insect study

Bug Maine-ia 2013 (8)

A game shows how careful observers might help find Maine’s lost ladybugs.

Bug Maine-ia!
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Maine State Museum, Augusta, Maine

Each September for the past 11 years, children from all over the state have swarmed to the hive of insect activity and information offered by the Maine State Museum’s Bug Maine-ia!  This year, more than 2000 visitors kept presenters hopping!  The Friends of Edith Marion Patch are proud to have been a part of this important event since its beginning.  At our table, young learners enjoy finding out about the little girl of long ago who loved insects and grew up to be one of the world’s leading insect experts. At this year’s EMP display, they also learned how they could follow in Edith Patch’s footsteps as a keen observer of insects in the wild: An observation and matching game introduced them to Maine’s lost ladybug species and provided tools for participating in the national Lost Ladybug project.
Edie King, an Associate of the Friends of Dr. Edith Marion Patch and avid amateur entomologist, is also an annual presenter at Bug Maine-ia! Edie exhibits her insect photography and provides tips on how young insect enthusiasts can start their own collections.
*****

Insect Adventures!
Saturday, May 18, 2013
10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Orono Public Library
39 Pine Street, Orono Maine

After days of rain, the sun came out to shine on dozens of children and their grown-up companions, as they went on a bug hunt, peeked through microscopes, inspected water insects, made bug crafts, and more. This annual community event is co-sponsored by Orono Public Library Youth Services.

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